Heartland Express | February 15, 2018

Heartland Express | February 15, 2018

February 15, 2018 Volume 22 Issue 3 PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE POSTAL CUSTOMER MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 2/2/18 Nebraska Slaughter Steers, 35-65% Choice, Live Weight........118.56 119.00 124.50 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600 lb.....157.84 185.07 192.70 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame 750-800 lb ..... 130.53 158.94 153.27 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750 lb. Carcass................................192.88 207.99 209.51 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price Carcass, Negotiated ............ NA 66.01 72.57 Pork Carcass Cutout, 185 lb. Carcass 51-52% Lean................83.53 77.58 80.48 Slaughter Lambs, wooled and shorn, 135-165 lb. Nationalq ...139.75q 127.92q NA National Carcass Lamb Cutout FOB .......................................336.91 q369.87 365.26 Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 2/2/18 Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu ...............................................2.98 3.45 3.93 Corn, No. 2, Yellow Columbus, bu ............................................3.21 3.20 3.33 Soybeans, No. 1, Yellow Columbus, bu .....................................9.37 8.81 8.87 Grain Sorghum, No.2, Yellow Dorchester, cwt ..........................5.07 5.99 5.96 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, Mn, bu....................................3.14 2.83 2.96 Feed Alfalfa, Large Square Bales, Good to Premium, RFV 160-185 Northeast Nebraska, ton ..............................147.50 * 166.25 Alfalfa, Large Rounds, Good Platte Valley, ton.........................65.00 90.00 90.00 Grass Hay, Large Rounds, Good Nebraska, ton.......................65.00 82.50 82.50 Dried Distillers Grains, 10% Moisture Nebraska Average ........105.00 145.50 151.00 Wet Distillers Grains, 65-70% Moisture Nebraska Average ......43.25 45.25 48.00 www.agnet.net For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit www.agnet.net Classifieds .............................................................. 18-19 Irrigation .............................................................. 10-11 Triumph of Ag Expo ..................................................................... 4 FFA Special Section Cass, Douglas, Gage, Johnson, Lancaster, Nemaha, Otoe, Pawnee, Richardson, & Saunders Counties ........ 5-9 Burt, Cedar, Cuming, Dakota, Dixon, Dodge, Stanton, Thurston, Washington, Wayne Counties .................................. 14-15 Country Living Country Living ........................................... 2 Markets Grain & Livestock...................................... 3 Livestock News Heartland Cattleman ............................... 16 DAVID HENDEE BH News Service DAKOTA CITY, Neb. — Like thousands of other Nebraskans and Iowans, Caroline Geschke has deep farm roots but lives far afield from the 30-cow dairy operation of her childhood. She realizes that sooner or later, however, she will make the generational transition from farmer’s daughter to farmer — even if she is 120 miles and decades away from her family farm. “And that’s why I’m trying to get ahead of the game now,” Geschke said. Geschke was one of more than 325 people who attended University of Nebraska-Lincoln farm transition and inheritance meetings from Bridgeport to Weeping Water across the state in recent months. The seminar series is titled, “So You’ve Inherited a Farm, Now What?” The programs for those who have inherited farmland or may do so in the future are the work Allan Vyhnalek, an extension educator, and Jim Jansen, an extension economist. The series continues with two online sessions later this month. Vyhnalek said he is contacted monthly by people from Omaha, Lincoln and elsewhere across Nebraska whose parents have died and who have become absentee landowners managing a farm for the first time in their lives. “They may have even grown up there, but haven’t been around for 30 or 40 years and need to understand that farming practices and management concepts have changed,” he said. Roughly half of the agricultural land in Nebraska is rented, and a significant number of the owners of these farms and ranches live in towns and cities across the state and elsewhere, Jansen said. The average value of an inherited Nebraska farm is $1.25 million, he said. “So inheriting a farm usually brings a number of questions, especially for those who are one or two generations removed from the operation,” he said. Vyhnalek has worked in extension in Nebraska and Iowa for 30 years. A native of Saline County, Nebraska, he has a master’s degree in agricultural education from UNL. He is based in Lincoln. Jansen is a regional economist who lives in Cedar County and works out of the NU Extension’s Northeast District office at Concord. Geschke is a 58-year-old retired postal worker who lives on an acreage near Dakota City in northeast Nebraska. She grew up with brothers Ken and Mark on their parents’ Grade A dairy farm in Cass County near Murdock between Omaha and Lincoln. Continued on page 13 UNL holds seminars across Nebraska on what to do if you inherit a farm Caroline Geschke's family has owned this land near Murdock for generations.

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