Heartland Express | January 11, 2018

AG & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT For more information call 1-800-846-5157 or visit www.AgHeaters.com And We Don’t Stop There! • Boilers for floor or radiant heat • Incinerators and Crematories Free Heat For Your Shop – Pressure Washers “Defender” Protection Bumpers See us this winter at • Nebraska Cattlemen’s Classic • Valentine Bull Bash • Triumph of Ag Expo VAL6 - CALVING TIME’S #1 TOOL! 10004164 MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average Year Ago 4 Wks Prior 12/15/17 Nebraska Slaughter Steers, 35-65% Choice, Live Weight..............* NA * Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600 lb.......145.49 NA 177.37 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame 750-800 lb ........ 137.76 NA 162.67 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750 lb. Carcass...................................192.05 NA 203.00 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price Carcass, Negotiated .............53.21 NA 55.42 Pork Carcass Cutout, 185 lb. Carcass 51-52% Lean...................76.42 NA 76.81 Slaughter Lambs, wooled and shorn, 135-165 lb. National ........138.63 NA 132.24 National Carcass Lamb Cutout FOB ......................................... 350.69 NA 380.49 Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Prior 12/15/17 Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu ..................................................2.72 NA 3.24 Corn, No. 2, Yellow Columbus, bu .............................................. 3.06 NA 3.12 Soybeans, No. 1, Yellow Columbus, bu ....................................... 9.29 NA 8.76 Grain Sorghum, No.2, Yellow Dorchester, cwt .............................4.70 NA 5.57 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, Mn, bu......................................2.97 NA 2.79 Feed Alfalfa, Large Square Bales, Good to Premium, RFV 160-185 Northeast Nebraska, ton ....................................* NA 162.50 Alfalfa, Large Rounds, Good Platte Valley, ton............................67.50 NA 87.50 Grass Hay, Large Rounds, Good Nebraska, ton......................... 65.00 NA 82.50 Dried Distillers Grains, 10% Moisture Nebraska Average ...........110.00 NA 150.50 Wet Distillers Grains, 65-70% Moisture Nebraska Average ........ 43.50 NA 45.00 Network Service Co. www.farmandranchnetwork.net Your source for ag news that affects Nebraska and the Plains region. For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit www.farmandranchnetwork.net Proud Supporters Of January 11, 2018 Volume 22 Issue 1 PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE POSTAL CUSTOMER Markets Livestock, Grain & Hay........................... 2 Heartland Cattleman Pages .................................................4 & 5 Country Living Floor Plan ................................................ 3 Classifieds Pages .............................................14 & 15 Nebraska students tackle a state- centric environmental problem - cow burps - with award-winning results CORY MATTESON Lincoln Journal Star Nic Kite grew up on a small farm in Nemaha County, and has fond memories of going to livestock auctions with his grandfather, where they’d survey everything from a heifer's midsection to its gait in an effort to try to size up its potential value. A while back, when he was home during a break from studying biochemistry at the University of Nebraska- Lincoln, Kite had a dinner conversation about a methane gas-reduction effort in California. Livestock is to blame for about a quarter of methane emissions released into the atmosphere, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, and the gas it expels has about 25 times as much impact as carbon dioxide, making it a key contributor to climate change. But many California dairy farmers decried a plan that would put the onus on them to change or face financial penalties. Derisively labeled the “cow fart tax” in several headlines in the fall of 2016, Kite said everyone at the dinner table agreed that taxing the problem wouldn’t fly in Nebraska, home to more than 6.4 million cattle, 60 to 80 of which are typically on the Kite family farm. “We all thought it was a silly idea, but we all thought it was a concern,” he said. This past year, Kite and six other students spent hours upon hours working on two different solutions, and their project was among those awarded a gold medal at an international competition attended by more than 4,000 students in November in Boston. Rather than taxing farmers or streamlining costly methane digester systems found on some farms, the team aimed at the guts of the problem. And the project used E. coli — the bacteria often associated with contaminated food — as a key part of the solution, for now. The students —Kite, Tyler Barker, Alexis Krepps, Jessica Harms, Nick Flaxbeard, Logan Uhlir of UNL and Lincoln East High School student Crystal Xu — are the second team assembled at UNL to participate in the International Genetically Engineered Machines competition, and the school’s first to earn a gold medal. Last year’s inaugural team earned a silver medal for its project, centered around reducing nitrate levels in water. The annual competition brings together hundreds of teams and thousands of participants, most of them undergrad college students from an array of disciplines, to address key problems with genetically engineered systems. Many teams tackle problems germane to the region from which the students hail. The team from Ghana wowed judges this year with a project that created a bio-mining organism to allow small- scale gold miners in the country to draw the precious metal from ore without using mercury and other toxic chemicals. Kite said that as the Nebraska team brainstormed potential projects early in the yearlong process of readying for iGEM, the group agreed — it should be a Nebraska project. “I think it helps a lot,” he said. “I felt when we went to the competition like we should represent where we come from.” They come from a state that raises the second-most cattle in the country, behind only far-larger Texas. The team members, majoring in a variety of engineering and scientific disciplines (Xu, the high school student, intends to become a surgeon), addressed an issue that could reduce the state’s environmental footprint, as they stated in their project outline. Methane is produced in the first chamber of a cow’s four stomachs as it begins the digestive process. A little more specifically, methanogens convert the hydrogen and Continued on page 4 Buffalo Bill Farm & Ranch Expo Pages .................................................6 & 7 KNEB Farm & Ranch Expo Pages ................................................8 - 10 KZ100 Farm & Life Expo Pages ..............................................11 - 13

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