Heartland Express | March 1, 2018

Heartland Express | March 1, 2018

March 1, 2018 Volume 22 Issue 4 PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE POSTAL CUSTOMER MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 2/17/18 Nebraska Slaughter Steers, 35-65% Choice, Live Weight..........122.00 * * Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600 lb.......158.79 185.50 179.94 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame 750-800 lb ........137.56 152.13 166.31 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750 lb. Carcass...................................191.65 205.89 212.59 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price Carcass, Negotiated .............63.79 69.61 58.91 Pork Carcass Cutout, 185 lb. Carcass 51-52% Lean...................78.99 80.05 80.40 Slaughter Lambs, wooled and shorn, 135-165 lb. National ........141.93 128.01 134.9 National Carcass Lamb Cutout FOB ..........................................347.75 368.74 372.54 Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 2/17/18 Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu ..................................................3.07 3.46 4.15 Corn, No. 2, Yellow Columbus, bu .............................................. 3.26 3.25 3.43 Soybeans, No. 1, Yellow Columbus, bu ........................................9.67 8.99 9.41 Grain Sorghum, No.2, Yellow Dorchester, cwt ............................ 5.03 6.34 5.63 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, Mn, bu..................................... 2.90 3.08 2.98 Feed Alfalfa, Large Square Bales, Good to Premium, RFV 160-185 Northeast Nebraska, ton ................................145.00 * 156.25 Alfalfa, Large Rounds, Good Platte Valley, ton............................70.00 90.00 90.00 Grass Hay, Large Rounds, Good Nebraska, ton......................... 85.00 82.50 82.50 Dried Distillers Grains, 10% Moisture Nebraska Average ...........107.25 151.50 146.50 Wet Distillers Grains, 65-70% Moisture Nebraska Average ........ 43.50 47.00 48.25 Network Service Co. www.farmandranchnetwork.net Your source for ag news that affects Nebraska and the Plains region. For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit www.farmandranchnetwork.net Proud Supporters Of Students in UNL's Tractor Restoration Club help keep history alive RYAN SODERLIN / World-Herald staff writer Sparks flew from the disc of a hand-held angle grinder as a member of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Tractor Restoration Club adjusted the fit of a 1946 John Deere tractor’s grill. The club’s shop, on UNL’s East Campus, buzzed with the noise of work. The tractor club started out small in 2005 and has grown over the years. “We started with two students and we’ve had at best 20, which is kind of tight with that many people in that little shop, but we make it work,” said club adviser Doug Koozer. The club’s appeal extends beyond agriculture majors. A couple of future engineers and a few studying the health sciences round out its numbers. Aside from occasional ribbing from friends, students like Tara Maulsby of Omaha, who is studying community health and wellness at UNL, find the work of restoring tractors to be fun, though it’s a bit greasy. “I love puzzles. And so if I take apart a tractor or take apart a piece of it ... I get to redo it, I get to fix it up, I get to paint it and put it all back together,” Maulsby said. “I’m also in a sorority, and so they sometimes make fun of me,” she added. “They’re like ‘You’re like an ag kid.’ I’m like, not really. I just like to work with my hands and getting dirty and stuff.” Complex modern tractors require trained mechanics, but with vintage equipment even a hobbyist can get one running, the students said. “It’s agrarian. It’s simple. Everything is right where you need it to be,” said club President Joshua Bauer of Lincoln, who is studying biological systems engineering. “There’s no computer chips, no microchips, none of that. It’s, ‘Do you have gas? Do you have spark? Are pistons free? And here we go.’ ” Their work space is next door to Lincoln’s Lester F. Larsen Tractor Test and Power Museum, which is the original home of the Nebraska Tractor Test Laboratory, the first tractor test facility in the world, museum manager Julie Thomson said. The club has helped restore some of the museum’s machines. Tractors that still run include a Farmall F-12, a Coop E3 and a John Deere H. The group recently restored a 1945 Allis Chalmers Model C for the Homestead National Monument’s Heritage Center in Beatrice. The club’s current project is a 1946 John Deere Model 69 Prototype M. The partnership among the club, the museum and donors is essential to the museum’s success, Thomson said. Some of the tractors are donated, and the museum depends on the club to restore them. Classifieds .............................................................. 22-23 Shop Hop ................................................................... 15 FFA Special Section Buffalo, Dawson, Franklin, Furnas Hall, Harlan, Howard, Kearney, Phelps, Sherman, Webster Counties ............... 4-14 Banner, Box Butte, Dawes, Deuel, Garden, Kimball, Morrill, Scotts Bluff, Sheridan, Sioux Counties .................. 16-17 Country Living Country Living ........................................... 3 Markets Grain & Livestock...................................... 2 Livestock News Heartland Cattleman ............................... 19 Jaythan Scheider, a UNL junior from Scotia, NE, works on the Tractor Restoration Club’s latest project: a 1946 John Deere Model 69 Prototype M. The club meets on Thursday nights on East campus. RYAN SODERLIN/THE WORLD-HERALD Continues on Page 3

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