Nebraska Edition | Apr 11, 2019

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE POSTAL CUSTOMER NEBRASKA EDITION F arm R anch aPRIL 11, 2019 Vol. 23 Issue 6 MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 4/10/19 Nebraska Slaughter Steers, 35-65% Choice, Live Weight..........115.00 * * Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600 lb....... 183.16 179.33 182.93 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame 750-800 lb.........146.31 151.36 153.59 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750 lb. Carcass................................... 217.41 224.94 226.48 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price Carcass, Negotiated..............46.26 48.42 74.38 Pork Carcass Cutout, 185 lb. Carcass 51-52% Lean...................67.76 62.87 80.45 Slaughter Lambs, wooled and shorn, 135-165 lb. National.........145.73 141.07 145.06 National Carcass Lamb Cutout FOB...........................................373.73 372.16 182.04 Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 4/10/19 Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu...................................................4.57 3.83 4.07 Corn, No. 2, Yellow Columbus, bu............................................... 3.65 3.41 3.44 Soybeans, No. 1, Yellow Columbus, bu........................................ 9.65 7.84 7.97 Grain Sorghum, No.2, Yellow Dorchester, cwt..............................5.91 5.29 5.45 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, Mn, bu......................................2.74 3.11 3.21 Feed Alfalfa, Large Square Bales, Good to Premium, RFV 160-185 Northeast Nebraska, ton.....................................* 175.00 * Alfalfa, Large Rounds, Good Platte Valley, ton............................97.50 105.00 112.50 Grass Hay, Large Rounds, Good Nebraska, ton.............................* 92.50 * Dried Distillers Grains, 10% Moisture Nebraska Average............160.00 145.50 153.50 Wet Distillers Grains, 65-70% Moisture Nebraska Average..........51.50 50.00 47.50 For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit www.farmandranchnetwork.net Proud Supporters Of farmandranchnetwork.net Your source for ag news that affects Nebraska and the Plains region. F arm R anch NetworkServiceCo FFA SPECIAL SECTION Antelope, Boone, Butler, Clay, Colfax, Fillmore, Hamilton, Jefferson, Knox, Madison, Merrick, Nance, Nuckolls, Pierce, Platte, Polk, Saline, Seward, Thayer, & York Counties................ 4-16 markets grain, hay, & cattle................................2 country living floor plan................................................3 hEARTLAND CATTLEMAN livestock news. ...................................17 welcome to kearney Kearney events & map................. 19-21 CLASSIFIEDS ........................................................ 22-23 State’s planting intentions altered because of flooding The USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service recently reported corn acres will be up in Nebraska this year and soybean acres will be down. But those estimates were based on a survey conducted during the first two weeks of March — before Nebraska was hit with massive flooding and a blizzard. CoBank reported the flooding in Nebraska and Iowa is “threatening farm livelihoods, disrupting transportation, hurting ag retailers and processors, and will impact the country’s 2019 corn/soybean acreage mix.” The USDA plantings estimates will be impacted as farmers find alternatives for their crops as planting deadlines for long-term corn varieties approach, usually in mid-April and many fields remain too damage or too wet for planting. One advantage Nebraska has is irrigation. Last year, irrigated corn acres in the state were 5.3 million compared to nearly 4 million non-irrigated lands. According to the USDA report released in March, Nebraska corn growers intended to plant 9.70 million acres this year, up 1 percent from 2018. Nebraska’s 2018 corn crop was at 1.80 billion bushels, up 7 percent from 2017 production. The yield was 195 bushels per acre, up 14 bushels from 2017. Both yield and production were record highs. Nationwide, corn planted area for all purposes in 2019 is estimated at 92.8 million acres, up 4 percent or 3.66 million acres from last year. Compared with the previous year, the USDA said planted acreage is expected to be up or unchanged in 34 of the 48 estimating states. In Nebraska, soybean planted acreages this year are expected to be 5.40 million acres, down 5 percent from last year. Last year, Nebraska soybean production was 345 million bushels, up 6 percent from 2017. Area for harvest, at 5.65 million acres, was slightly below 2017. Yield is forecast at 61 bushels per acre, up 3.5 bushels from last year. Both yield and production were a record high. Last year, soybeans planted on irrigated land was 2.776 million acres. Nationwide, soybean planted area for 2019 is estimated at 84.6 million acres, down 5 percent from last year. Compared to the previous year, planted acreage is down or unchanged in 26 of the 29 estimating states. If Nebraska farmers are delayed in planting corn because of the wet soil conditions, many may turn to other crops that can be planted later, such as soybeans and sorghum. Market analysts said one of the reasons why estimated soybean acres were down this year is the ongoing trade dispute between the United Sates and China. China is a large purchaser of U.S. soybeans. CoBank recently reported “trade negotiations with China will carry on at least through April, and perhaps into the summer. However, an agreement is in the interest of both the Xi and Trump administrations, so a deal is expected to be struck.” While the University of Nebraska Extension Service reports soybeans can be planted into early June, the best results come from soybeans planted before May. Another late season crop alternative is sorghum. The USDA said sorghum growers in Nebraska intend to plant 210,000 acres, down 9 percent from a year ago. Last year in Nebraska, sorghum production was 15.8 million bushels, up 32 percent from the previous year. Area for harvest, at 155,000 acres, was 15 percent above 2017. Yield is a record, forecast at 102 bushels per acre, up 13 bushels from last year. According to the Nebraska Grain Sorghum Board, the crop can be planted in Nebraska between May 1 and June 25. The board said recent developments regarding Chinese orders for sorghum at a total of nearly 6 million bushels of sorghum “offer additional cause for optimism.” Hay is Nebraska’s third largest cash crop. Last year, alfalfa hay production in Nebraska was at 3.61 million tons, up 10 percent from the previous year. Area for harvest, at 880,000 acres, was up 6 percent from a year ago. The yield of 4.10 tons per acre is up 0.15 ton from 2017. All other hay production in the state last year was 3.70 million tons, up 28 percent from last year. Area for Continued on page 3 Robert Pore, Grand Island Independent Photo: Ryan Soderlin

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