Nebraska Edition | Feb 14, 2019

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE POSTAL CUSTOMER NEBRASKA EDITION F arm R anch February 14, 2019 Vol. 23 Issue 3 MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 2/1/19 Nebraska Slaughter Steers, 35-65% Choice, Live Weight..........125.00 * * Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600 lb.......196.41 177.98 177.15 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame 750-800 lb.........154.79 150.98 149.16 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750 lb. Carcass...................................206.70 215.75 216.65 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price Carcass, Negotiated..............69.27 49.84 50.22 Pork Carcass Cutout, 185 lb. Carcass 51-52% Lean...................81.41 68.52 66.11 Slaughter Lambs, wooled and shorn, 135-165 lb. National.........133.29 134.55 131.38 National Carcass Lamb Cutout FOB...........................................362.34 386.15 380.90 Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 2/1/19 Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu.................................................. 3.80 4.53 4.63 Corn, No. 2, Yellow Columbus, bu................................................3.32 3.52 3.52 Soybeans, No. 1, Yellow Columbus, bu.........................................9.07 8.13 8.15 Grain Sorghum, No.2, Yellow Dorchester, cwt............................. 6.58 5.75 5.70 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, Mn, bu......................................3.01 3.24 3.30 Feed Alfalfa, Large Square Bales, Good to Premium, RFV 160-185 Northeast Nebraska, ton.................................166.25 * * Alfalfa, Large Rounds, Good Platte Valley, ton........................... 90.00 103.00 100.00 Grass Hay, Large Rounds, Good Nebraska, ton..........................82.50 87.50 85.00 Dried Distillers Grains, 10% Moisture Nebraska Average............150.00 155.00 142.50 Wet Distillers Grains, 65-70% Moisture Nebraska Average..........47.50 53.00 52.50 For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit www.farmandranchnetwork.net Proud Supporters Of farmandranchnetwork.net Your source for ag news that affects Nebraska and the Plains region. F arm R anch NetworkServiceCo FFA SPECIAL SECTION Cass, Douglas, Gage, Johnson, Lancaster, Nemaha, Otoe, Pawnee, Richardson, & Saunders Counties. ............................ 3-8 Burt, Cedar, Cuming, Dakota, Dixon, Dodge, Stanton, Thurston, Washington, & Wayne Counties................................ 9-11 COUNTRY LIVING floor plan..................................................... 2 CLASSIFIEDS .............................................................. 12-14 hEARTLAND CATTLEMAN Livestock News........................................ 15 Triumph of ag expo ................................................................... 18 irrigation .............................................................. 16-17 markets grain, hay, & cattle................................... 19 Bill calls for shift in taxes of ag land onto sales taxes By Paul Hammel BH News Service LINCOLN — A coalition of farmers rolled out its plan to reduce property taxes on farmers on Tuesday, arguing that increasing sales taxes is the best course for solving the state’s most vexing tax problem: high property taxes. Detractors say the plan, released by a group called Fair Nebraska, is too weighted to benefit farmers. Perhaps as a result, no senator was willing to introduce it in the Nebraska Legislature this year — a year in which addressing high property taxes is a high priority. But Fair Nebraska members say that dramatic changes are needed for the state’s No. 1 industry, agriculture. “We’re not only not competitive with other states, we’re not competitive with our neighboring school districts,” said York farmer Doug Nienhueser, one of the leaders of the group. The Fair Nebraska plan calls for raising sales taxes by three-quarters of a cent, ending the sales tax exemption on groceries and redirecting the current state property tax credits, among other things, to dramatically increase state support for K-12 schools, which would allow farm and ranch land to be totally exempt from property taxes for local education. Farmers and ranchers would continue to pay property taxes on their homes and buildings under the plan, which assumes that they would increase spending and investment, boosting sales and income taxes by almost $43 million. It would cause nearly a $1 billion tax shift by 2023, the organization estimated, with higher taxes being paid in the state’s largest counties. Nienhueser disputed that the plan benefited only farmers and said that even though no senator would introduce their plan, it was important to educate state senators about the big increase in property tax bills. The group’s luncheon on Tuesday was attended by about a dozen state senators. It also served to unveil a study, commissioned by Fair Nebraska, about the state’s property tax problems that was done by Creighton University economist Ernie Goss. State Sen. Lou Ann Linehan of Elkhorn, who chairs the Legislature’s Revenue Committee, said she sympathizes with farmers, but could not support their plan. She said she supported some portions of the proposal and was particularly interested in information provided by Goss that said total state and local support for K-12 schools was about $363 million a year more than the median provided in neighboring states. Linehan, who will guide the crafting of a property tax relief proposals this year, said that any solution needs to include provisions to rein in school spending. “Why are we spending more on students than other states around us? It’s a question we have to ask,” the senator said. Continued on page 2

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