Nebraska Edition | June 20, 2019

MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 6/7/19 Nebraska Slaughter Steers, 35-65% Choice, Live Weight..............* * 114.00 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600 lb.......183.76 NA 174.72 Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame 750-800 lb......... 158.13 NA 147.46 Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750 lb. Carcass.................................. 226.95 223.49 222.57 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price Carcass, Negotiated..............78.89 77.83 * Pork Carcass Cutout, 185 lb. Carcass 51-52% Lean...................78.07 84.72 82.28 Slaughter Lambs, wooled and shorn, 135-165 lb. National.........162.85 154.10 157.80 National Carcass Lamb Cutout FOB...........................................379.29 386.97 388.26 Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 6/7/19 Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu...................................................4.78 3.65 4.08 Corn, No. 2, Yellow Columbus, bu................................................3.49 3.42 4.00 Soybeans, No. 1, Yellow Columbus, bu.........................................8.79 7.01 7.60 Grain Sorghum, No.2, Yellow Dorchester, cwt............................. 5.40 5.30 6.36 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, Mn, bu..................................... 2.90 3.20 3.25 Feed Alfalfa, Large Square Bales, Good to Premium, RFV 160-185 Northeast Nebraska, ton.................................170.00 * * Alfalfa, Large Rounds, Good Platte Valley, ton...........................100.00 115.00 110.00 Grass Hay, Large Rounds, Good Nebraska, ton.........................102.50 90.00 97.50 Dried Distillers Grains, 10% Moisture Nebraska Average............144.00 114.50 128.50 Wet Distillers Grains, 65-70% Moisture Nebraska Average......... 40.50 42.50 50.00 For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit www.farmandranchnetwork.net Proud Supporters Of farmandranchnetwork.net Your source for ag news that affects Nebraska and the Plains region. F arm R anch NetworkServiceCo COUNTY FAIRS Adams....................................................5 Boone.....................................................8 Cedar......................................................8 Clay. .......................................................7 Dawson.............................................. 6-7 Dodge.....................................................8 Fillmore..................................................9 Franklin................................................13 Furnas..................................................12 Hall. ................................................ 10-11 Hitchcock.............................................13 Jefferson................................................9 Madison. ..............................................14 Nemaha................................................13 Nuckolls...............................................12 Pierce...................................................14 Platte....................................................15 Saline. ....................................................5 markets Grain, hay, & cattle...............................2 country living Floor plan...............................................3 LIVESTOCK NEWS Heartland Cattleman......................... 4-5 RODEO ........................................................ 15-16 CLASSIFIEDS ........................................................ 18-19 PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE POSTAL CUSTOMER NEBRASKA EDITION F arm R anch June 20, 2019 Vol. 23 Issue 9 ‘Everything is growing slow’ By Lori Potter, Kearney Hub HOLDREGE — Sunshine and warmer weather will help emerging corn and soybean plants grow into green carpets covering south-central Nebraska fields. It’s a beautiful sight for farmers who struggled to get those crops planted during an extremely wet spring, but small comfort to producers still waiting for fields to dry. South-central farmers who said most crops are planted in their areas added that they know many “holes and wet spots” remain. “About 75 to 80 percent was finished timely,” Dave Rowe of Johnson Lake said about corn planting in his area of Gosper County. “The rest has been a scramble.” Axtell farmer Dudley Nelson said the only planting left on his schedule is a neighbor’s soybean field. That job was postponed by rain early Monday morning. “Everything is growing slow. The corn isn’t even 6 inches yet,” Nelson said. “We need heat and sunshine.” Rowe joked that the corn plants so far have needed sweater vests. Dave Nelson of Minden said some farmers who finished planting, even if it was two or more weeks later than normal, were glad to see the Monday morning rain because it helped break the soil crust for emerging plants. “It was a godsend rain,” he said, “if you had the crops in.” University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Educator Todd Whitney, whose focus area is Phelps, Gosper, Harlan and Furnas counties, said, “We are blessed compared to the Eastern Cornbelt and northeast Nebraska.” While traveling to a Columbia, Mo., conference last week, he saw flooded Kansas and Missouri farms. Extension colleagues from Illinois told him some farmers there haven’t planted any 2019 crops. Some fields too wet for planting in central Nebraska, some crops off to slow start Photo by Lori Potter, Kearney Hub Continued on page 3 University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Educator Todd Whitney and south-central Nebraska farmers know the two things most needed for newly emerged corn and soybean plants are warm temperatures and sunshine. Corn on the east end of this field east of Holdrege is standing in water, a condition made worse by rain early Monday morning. Lori Potter, Kearney Hub

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