Nebraska Edition | May 23, 2019

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage Paid Permit #36 OMAHA, NE POSTAL CUSTOMER NEBRASKA EDITION F arm R anch MAY 23, 2019 Vol. 23 Issue 8 MARKET GLANCE Livestock and Products, Weekly Average Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 5/10/19 Nebraska Slaughter Steers, 35-65% Choice, Live Weight..............* * * Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame, 550-600 lb.......176.73 183.34 N/A Nebraska Feeder Steers, Med. & Large Frame 750-800 lb.........145.75 155.53 N/A Choice Boxed Beef, 600-750 lb. Carcass...................................230.61 228.72 223.49 Western Corn Belt Base Hog Price Carcass, Negotiated............. 63.64 77.57 77.83 Pork Carcass Cutout, 185 lb. Carcass 51-52% Lean................... 71.74 83.44 84.72 Slaughter Lambs, wooled and shorn, 135-165 lb. National.........152.57 151.43 154.10 National Carcass Lamb Cutout FOB...........................................378.93 378.38 386.39 Crops, Daily Spot Prices Year Ago 4 Wks Ago 5/10/19 Wheat, No. 1, H.W. Imperial, bu...................................................4.31 4.02 3.65 Corn, No. 2, Yellow Columbus, bu................................................3.70 3.51 3.42 Soybeans, No. 1, Yellow Columbus, bu........................................ 9.33 7.97 7.01 Grain Sorghum, No.2, Yellow Dorchester, cwt............................. 5.83 5.50 5.30 Oats, No. 2, Heavy Minneapolis, Mn, bu......................................2.87 3.21 3.20 Feed Alfalfa, Large Square Bales, Good to Premium, RFV 160-185 Northeast Nebraska, ton.....................................* 170.00 * Alfalfa, Large Rounds, Good Platte Valley, ton...............................* 112.50 115.00 Grass Hay, Large Rounds, Good Nebraska, ton.............................* 90.00 90.00 Dried Distillers Grains, 10% Moisture Nebraska Average............165.00 148.00 114.50 Wet Distillers Grains, 65-70% Moisture Nebraska Average..........51.50 47.50 42.50 For daily agriculture news, updates and local happenings, visit www.farmandranchnetwork.net Proud Supporters Of farmandranchnetwork.net Your source for ag news that affects Nebraska and the Plains region. F arm R anch NetworkServiceCo Featured Sections Rodeo.....................................................4 Museum of Nebraska Art. ................ 6-7 Nebraskaland Days....................... 10-12 Tractor Pulls........................................14 Irrigation. .............................................15 Sandhills Ranch Expo.................. 16-17 markets Grain, hay, & cattle...............................2 country living Floor plan...............................................3 CLASSIFIEDS ............................................................ 8-9 hEARTLAND CATTLEMAN Livestock news. ..................................18 In the Cornhusker State, beef is king By Spike Jordan, Star-Herald SCOTTSBLUFF — On Wednesday, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts issued the annual proclamation declaring May as Beef Month in the state. The yearly celebration each May highlights the importance of the cattle industry. While agriculture is “Nebraska’s economic engine”, the farmers, ranchers and feeder operations that make up the state’s cattle industry are that engine’s pistons. “Nebraska’s beef producers are the best in the business,” Ricketts said during a press conference in Lincoln on Wednesday. “Thanks to their excellent work, Nebraska tops all states in commercial red meat production and cattle on feed.” Ricketts said that Nebraska beef has rightfully earned a reputation for its premium quality, as evidenced by statistics. The beef industry is usually a $6.5 billion sector of the economy, and trade missions overseas helped Nebraska lead the nation in beef exports in 2018, with a total export value of $1.44 billion. “We saw our exports to Singapore were up 57 percent, exports to the Philippines up 78 percent,” Ricketts said, “China was up 88 percent and Indonesia was up 86 percent, so, we had big increases in a lot of key markets.” Nebraska’s beef exports increased by 14 percent from 2017 to 2018, and total beef exports have exceeded $1 billion each year since 2014. Nebraska’s top beef export markets for 2018 were: • Japan — $412.1 million • South Korea — $309.3 million • Hong Kong — $139.5 million • Mexico — $138 million • European Union — $124.3 million Ricketts was joined at the press conference Wednesday by Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) Director Steve Wellman, Nebraska Cattlemen President Mike Drinnin, and Nebraska Beef Council Chairman Buck Wehrbein. “There are a lot of unsung heroes who put their heart and soul into producing the best beef in the world raised right here in Nebraska,” Drinnin said. “Whether you’re fixing fence on a ranch, delivering feed to the cattle, or hauling the beef to restaurants, everyone’s important to showcasing Nebraska beef.” Wehrbein focused on the exports during his remarks. “Exports are a tremendous value to beef producers and we are proud to work with NDA to promote beef from Nebraska in places like Hong Kong, the European Union, and other parts of the globe,” Wehrbein said. “International trade missions are a strategic way of investing the beef checkoff to support our beef community.” According to the Nebraska Beef Council, cattle outnumber people in the state nearly 4 to 1. Cows number 1.94 million, versus Nebraska residents who number around 1.8 million, but adding in the 4.7 million head of cattle that are annually fed in Nebraska, it totals to nearly 6.64 million cattle. Nebraska is also home to the three largest beef-producing counties in the nation; The number one cow county is Cherry County, with nearly 166,000 cows. Custer County is in second with 100,000 head, and Holt County is third with 99,000 head. Also among the top counties in the nation is Lincoln County at number 12, with 69,000 head. The importance of cattle feeding to Nebraska’s economy runs deeper than it does anywhere else. Nearly 5 million head are finished and marketed in Nebraska, compared to Texas, which markets a third more cattle but has a population of 25.6 million residents — over 14 times larger. Or take Iowa, which markets less than 2 million cattle and has 1.2 million more residents than Nebraska. Those states depend on other industries, and their standard of living isn’t nearly as dependent on cattle feeding as Nebraska’s. Nebraska has a unique mix of natural resources. In what could be described as turning sunlight into protein, Cattle turn grass from 24 million acres of rangeland and pasture — more than one half of Nebraska’s land mass — into meat for humans. More than half of that rangeland and pasture is in the Nebraska Sandhills. The land grazed by cattle allows more people to be fed than would otherwise be possible. More than one billion bushels of corn are produced here each year, 40 percent of which is fed to livestock in the state. Cattle producing families, who make their living from the land, have a strong incentive to protect their animals and the environment. But that way of life is not completely easy. So the next time you head to the supermarket and walk by the deli or browsing the meat case, take a moment and pause. Think about those cattle ranchers that contribute to the welfare of your community. A steer is seen in a pen at the High Plains Feed Yard in southern Sioux County on Wednesday, April 10. According to the Nebraska Beef Council, cattle outnumber people in the state by nearly four to one. Spike Jordan/Star-Herald Blaine Flack of Crawford, Photo by Steve Moseley

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