Lincoln Highway | 2016 - page 9

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EBRASKA
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INCOLN
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IGHWAY
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ISTORIC
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YWAY
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Although the need for repairs was nearly inevitable, travelers
could equip their vehicles with heavy duty tires and tubes and
avert engine-cooling problems by retrofitting their radiators
with temperature gauge caps.
Heavy-duty electric replacement starters helped get motors
turning, while louder horns headed off stray cattle to prevent
them from wandering into travelers’
paths.
In Dodge County in eastern
Nebraska, three Fremont businesses
advertised round-the-clock service for
travelers.
Fremont’s Electric Garage Co.
offered “day and night service, gas and
electric repairing, storage and supplies.”
Larson Auto Co. boasted “We never
sleep” and advertised itself as “a safe
place to keep your car. Prompt and
efficient service.”
Finally,
Fremont’s
Brunswick
Restaurant near Union Station promised
“service at its best, open day and night.”
In Central City, travelers were
assured a telephone in every room at the
Hotel Ratcliff, along with running hot
and cold water. Rates were $2 per night
“American” and 50 cents “European.”
Central City’s Overland Garage
dealt in Hudson, Overland and Metz
automobiles and advertised “competent
workmen and courteous service,”
including a ladies’ waiting room.
At Overland Garage, travelers could
buy a Metz Twenty-Five for $600. Built in Waltham, Mass., the
touring car came fully equipped with a 25 horsepower engine,
electric lights and an electric starter backed up by a hand crank.
An electric “L” sign beckoned travelers to the Midway Hotel in
downtown Kearney, the center point of the Lincoln Highway.
The Midway’s 100 rooms came with or without baths and
access to sleeping porches. Midway
Garage was connected to the hotel.
Overnight rates ranged from $2 to $3
on the “American plan with everything
entirely modern, including a first-class
grill room.”
Noyes Garage was west of the opera
house in downtown Kearney and said
in its advertisement, “We have anything
in the supply line you desire. We do
the business because our service is the
best.”
Travelers on a budget could opt for
less expensive lodging.
In central Nebraska, Elm Creek
offered its Red Top Cabin Camp as an
alternative to hotel lodging. Campers
could cook their own food, which might
occasionally include a rabbit they
bagged along their route earlier in the
day.
The Lincoln Highway Association’s
guide suggested travelers pack hunting
rifles and camping supplies. Several
companies manufactured tents that
could be pitched and anchored to
vehicles.
Tourist Cabins,
Midway Hotel
and
Lincoln
Highway
memorabilia
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