UNK Today | August 2014 - page 47

2011 Central Ave., Kearney
(308) 236-7399
Weekly
Specials
Relax & Enjoy
Paddy O’Mally’s
Never a Cover Charge
Voted Nebraska’s #1 Irish Pub
Mon. Micro Monday - Micro Draws
$
3
00
Tues. Coors Light/Miller Light Longnecks
$
2
25
Wed. Burger
$
2
50
Fries
$
1
75
Draws
$
1
75
Pitchers
$
5
50
Thurs. College Night - Wells
$
3
00
Bottles
$
2
25
Fri.
Happy Hour 5-7 p.m. Pitchers
$
5
50
8-Close
$
5
00
Bomb /
$
5
50
Pitchers
NOW HIRING!!
2 Kearney Locations
1122 2nd Ave. • 4207 2nd Ave.
Great Daily Specials
Monday:
Chicken Soft Taco.........$2.29
or
BBQ Jack Burger ...........$2.29
Tuesday:
Crisp Meat Burrito.........$1.99
or
Crisp Chicken Burrito .$1.99
Wednesday:
2 Soft Tacos.................$3.79
or
Any Build-It ............. $1 OFF
Thursday:
2 Tacos..............................$1.79
or
Taco Salad ......................$4.49
Friday:
Grilled Chicken Rollup ..$4.19
or
Cheese Frenchee .............$3.19
Saturday
&Sunday:
Large Nachos ..............$4.29
or
Bacon Ranch
KINGburger Combo...$5.99
Tuesdays
$
12
00
Domestic
Buckets
Wednesdays
$
6
50
Mugs
after 6:00 p.m.
Liter Mugs
$
6
00
Thursday - All Night
Sat., 9 p.m. to Close
14 E. Railroad St. • 237-0751
North 2nd Avenue in the Vista Pointe Shopping Center • Kearney
234-3979 • Hours: Monday-Saturday 11am-1am, Sunday 11:30am-12am
Burger, Fries
& Beer
45
¢
$
4
25
All Day
Happy Hour!
Wing Night
$
14
99
Pizza & a Pitcher
Mon.-Thurs.
Late Night
Happy Hour
9pm-11pm
Show your student I.D.& get
20
%
Off
your meal
purchase
Good for dinner only.
Does not apply to lunch specials or alcohol.
Cannot be combinedwith any other offer.
320 3rd Ave • Kearney,NE
(308) 455-3085
WelcomeBackUNKStudents!
2524 1st Avenue Suite 6, Kearney, NE • 308-238-4210
Closed Monday • Tuesday-Saturday 6:30am-1:30pm
Sunday 9am-2pm
The Cozy Restaurant with a homemade menu.
Catering & Custom Menus,
beyond breakfast
Darci A. Kuhnel, Owner
The Breakfast Cart
& Catering
13 Different
Moscow Mules
Buy a $5 KOOZIE & get
HAPPY HOUR prices
all night long!
13 East 21st Street • 237-9259 • Tues.-Sat. 5:00pm - 1:00am
1306 2nd Ave • Kearney • 308-237-5812
Expires 9-30-14
$
2
00
ANY
PLATTER
OFF
WELCOME BACK
UNK STUDENTS!
698-0120
230 W. 42nd St, Kearney
PIZZA
$
6
00
!
LARGE
1 TOPPING
to get a
Bring in coupon
for
only
Dine with us
at San Pedro!
3907 Central Ave
Kearney
238-0092 or 234-6077
HOURS:
Mon.-Sat. 11:00am - 10:00pm
Sun.
11:30am - 9:00pm
Taco Tuesday
99¢
Check out our newmenu!
Drink& food specials everyday!
(Ground Beef or Shredded Chicken)
Working to help others
UNK
Today
:
After Hours
UNK Communications
KEARNEY — Carlos Pala-
cios wasn’t sure if he wanted to
attend college.
But seeing the struggles of
young people in his community
inspired him to pursue a degree
in criminal justice at the Uni-
versity of Nebraska at Kearney.
Palacios’ bachelor of science
degree in criminal justice made
him the first in his family to
earn a college degree.
Palacios, originally from
Guanajuato, Mexico, graduated
from Lexington High School in
2006 and worked at Landmark
Implement Inc., a John Deere
dealership.
When his boss at the deal-
ership offered to help pay his
tuition at Southeast Community
College in Milford, Palacios
reluctantly agreed.
“At first, I didn’t want to go
to college.”
He earned his associate of
applied science degree from the
college and returned to work
two more years at Landmark
Implement.
But Palacios saw a need in
his community.
“There weren’t a lot of
programs to help kids. Kids
that were on
probation were
struggling,” he
said. “I wanted
to make a dif-
ference and do
something that
could help kids.”
Three weeks
before the 2010
fall semester began, Palacios
quit his job and enrolled at
UNK.
“I had a little money saved,
but not enough for tuition.”
He wasn’t able to get finan-
cial assistance, so his parents,
Daniel and Carmen Palacios,
agreed to pay his tuition as long
as he earned As and Bs.
Even with his parents’ help,
Palacios struggled to get by
while attending UNK. He has
worked at Nick’s Gyros for 2½
years to pay monthly expenses.
The support from faculty and
resources such as the Writing
Center helped Palacios succeed
in his classes, which gave him
the drive to keep working.
“I liked
the one-on-
one inter-
action with
professors.
They know
your name
and make
you feel
comfortable
about talking
to them.
They make
it so you’re not afraid to ask
questions.”
During a trip to California
two years ago, Palacios’ inter-
est was piqued about the Los
Angeles Police Department. In
a recent class, he was given an
assignment to research a poten-
tial employer in the criminal
justice field. Palacios took the
assignment one step further
and applied for a job with the
LAPD.
Palacios was invited to
complete the Personal Qualifi-
cations Essay, the second step
in the application process. He
flew to Los
Angeles
during
spring
break to
take the
test, which
evaluates
judgment,
decision
making and
behavioral
flexibility.
He passed the test and can
now move on to the third
step in the application — the
background investigation and
polygraph examination.
However, Palacios can’t
afford to make another trip
to Los Angeles to take the
test. He plans to work until
he saves up enough money
to go back to California. The
LAPD also requires a phys-
ical abilities test, a depart-
ment interview, a medical
evaluation and psychological
evaluation to be considered
for employment.
Palacios began working at
the Youth Rehabilitation and
Treatment Center as a youth
security specialist in June.
But working as an attorney
also attracts him.
With some encouragement
from political science pro-
fessor Peter Longo, Palacios
took a tour of the University
of Nebraska College of Law in
Lincoln.
“I wanted to make certain
that I conveyed to him that
I recognized his abundant
talents,” Longo said. “Wheth-
er he goes to law school or
does police work or works at
YRTC, he will be able to take
on any job with ease. He’ll
be a success in any field he
enters.”
Although Palacios does
dream of attending law school
someday, he decided to put it
off until he can save money for
tuition.
He hopes to become a
criminal defense attorney or
practice immigration law.
Working with immigrants
would be especially mean-
ingful for Palacios. He, his
parents and siblings — Juan
and Judith — immigrated to
Greeley, Colo., from Mexico
in 1991 and moved to Lexing-
ton the following year.
Getting support from the
community and dealing with the
language barrier was a struggle
for his parents, Palacios said.
Becoming permanent U.S.
residents took nearly 20 years.
Palacios and his family still are
working to become citizens.
“He has a great sense of
humility and kindness,” Longo
said. “I can always feel his
sense of care and concern. He’s
also really smart. His com-
ments are always insightful,
and his writing work is always
first rate.”
Carlos Palacios
“There weren’t a
lot of
programs to help kids. Kids
that were on probation were
struggling. I wanted to make
a difference and do something
that could help kids.”
Carlos Palacios
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